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O'Reilly Sessions at WWDC

by Derrick Story
Mac Newsletter for 04/08/2005

Dear Mac Reader,

If you've been following Apple's crafting of this year's WWDC, you know that they're focused on providing a more hands-on approach to the conference. O'Reilly will play an important role in this change.

This shift at WWDC is a reflection of the revitalization I've seen inside of World Wide Developer Relations over the past eight months. Apple has always had good people inside of WWDR, but there were a few missing pieces. That's no longer the case. This current group has a chemistry that's energizing, and you'll get to experience some of this energy firsthand at the developer conference in San Francisco. Take a quick look here for a preview:

Once you're at the WWDC site, click on the Special Events tab. You'll see the Tuesday lunch session with Tim O'Reilly, followed by Wednesday and Thursday sessions by notables such as Guido van Rossum (Python), Rasmus Lerdorf (PHP), Nat Torkington (Open Source expert), and Phillip Torrone (BMWFilms award winner).

These sessions are going to be a blast. They'll work something like this. Apple is going to carve out rather long lunch breaks. Attendees will be able to grab a box lunch and attend the lunchtime session of their choice. There will be four running parallel on Wednesday and Thursday. Tim flies solo on Tuesday. (Like who am I going to put up against Tim O'Reilly?)

These sessions are moderated by the best of the best. If you're interested in Python, for example, then you get its creator, Guido van Rossum as your moderator. He'll also have a Mac Python expert there, plus Apple will provide one of its topnotch specialists too. You get to join in on the discussion, or just sit back and listen while you eat your lunch.

I've been working with WWDR at Apple for a couple of months on this program. And I have to say, I am thrilled to bring the O'Reilly experience to WWDC. I hope you can join us for lunch in June.

Until next time,

-Derrick

Derrick Story
Mac DevCenter Editor

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