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Flat Notes

by Derrick Story
Mac Newsletter for 09/03/2004

Dear Mac Reader,

I don't know why, but when I logged on to MSN Music, I expected to see something similar to the iTunes Music Store. Much to my surprise, I didn't.

My very first impression is flat. Very flat. Aside from a couple of semi-aqua buttons, totally flat. Music just seems more boring there. No knock on Microsoft. It's me. Really. I've become jaded. No longer will simple lists of songs satisfy me. I need top albums, essentials, slideshow billboards, celebrity playlists, side-shuffling albums... I need color! I want one-click ordering directly into my music jukebox. OK, I confess. I like metal.

Am I shallow? Most likely. But I don't want to change. And I'm certainly not switching music stores. I wish you well MSN Music. I'm sure it's perfect for some folks... those far less superficial than me.

On a related note... I can tell you one place music won't be boring. That's during the Stewart Copeland keynote at the upcoming Mac OS X Conference in Santa Clara, California. Not to mention sessions on Pro Tools, Logic, iPod Hacks, and GarageBand. Early-bird registration ends September 20.

If you want to make music with your Mac, you need to be at this event.

Until next time,
-Derrick

--
Derrick Story
Mac DevCenter Editor
derrick@oreilly.com

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