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Three Things

by Derrick Story
Mac Newsletter for 04/25/2003

Dear Mac Reader,

As the Emerging Technology Conference comes to a close, I'm wishing you could have been here. Not so much because it was such a cool show and all, which it was, but because it was such a fine moment for fans of the Mac platform.

As I look around here (and as you will see if you look at the pictures I've published), Macs and PCs were seen throughout the conference venues in equal numbers -- maybe even more Macs than Windows laptops. Watching those OS X machines operate so smoothly -- with their tireless batteries, instant sleep and awake, and effortless wireless connectivity -- made me think to myself: "this is the way computing is supposed to be." You might have had similar thoughts too had you been wandering the halls of the Westin.

Then I had the honor of presenting the Mac OS X Innovators Contest awards to Brent Simmons and Robb Beal on stage in front of the entire conference. Both Brent and Robb made short speeches. More than one person told me afterward that it was kind of touching to see these two smart, likeable, young men stand proudly before their peers and express their happiness and gratitude. I felt lucky to be the one who got to introduce them to the O'Reilly audience.

Second Thing...

The turnout for the Mac DevCenter online survey was fantastic. Nearly 1,300 participants in less than a week. The Mac turnout crushed the Java response, which was around 500. The O'Reilly survey team was truly impressed. My reply to them was, "This is a *real* computing community who knows how to support its members."

I should have the survey results waiting for me when I get back to the office next week, and I'll start working on the summary for you.

Third Thing...

So Monday is the big announcement by Steve at the new Moscone Center in San Francisco. I have an invite, so I'll take my camera and see what kind of shots I can get. To be honest, I don't know the details of what's going to be unveiled. But I'm looking forward to being there, and I'm pleased that Apple continues to be frisky in this miserable tech economy. Be sure to look for my report.

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Just One More Thing...

You know, a computer is just a thing, a machine. Of itself, has not heart or soul. Yet, because of our relationship with these tools, they often mirror the hearts and souls of their owners.

When I see Stewart Brand, Alan Kay, and Cory Doctorow with their iBooks, or Dan Gillmor and Tim O'Reilly with their TiBooks, I know that it isn't a coincidence that these men of technology, whom I respect, are using tools I like.

It's been a good week here for the Mac platform. I thought you'd like to know.

Until next time,
Derrick
--
Derrick Story
O'Reilly Network Managing Editor

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