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Upgrading O'Reilly's Mac

by Derrick Story
Mac Newsletter for 04/11/2003

Dear Mac Reader,

Business people seem very interested in what you think. But they hardly ever tell you why they want to know what you think. If you're a jaded person, such as myself, then you might assume they're not telling you because they're trying to hide how they're going to use the information. As Charles Barkley says, "I might be wrong, but I doubt it."

Having said that, I want to know what you think too. But I'll tell you why, and I hope it will be a good enough reason to convince you to complete our first-ever Mac DevCenter survey.

In this week's article, "Tell Us What You Think: The First Survey of Mac DevCenter Readers," I get more into the pure business side of things. You might want to read it online. But since I talk to you all the time here, I want to share a few things that aren't in the article.

You, as part of our Mac audience, have changed things here at O'Reilly. You see, before we got serious about the Mac platform three years ago (as OS X emerged), we tended to talk to developers in a very traditional developer way, mostly in code. We still do a lot of that, and will forever (I hope!). It's an aspect of O'Reilly that programmers appreciate.

But when the Mac folks arrived at the party, they brought a different attitude. There was less pretense and more communication. There was also more fun. Just because you write code for a living doesn't mean you don't want to play with an iPod and fiddle with iTunes. The developer landscape suddenly had more trees, lakes, and sunny afternoons.

This shift has set well here at O'Reilly. The once shunned Mac user, viewed as a GUI-only sissy, now ranks equally with the Linux, BSD, Java, and Perl programmers. And their toys are a welcome addition at any geek fest.

To subscribe to the Mac newsletter (or any O'Reilly Network newsletters), visit http://www.oreillynet.com/cs/user/home and select the newsletters you wish to receive in your user profile (you'll need to log in with your existing O'Reilly Network account -- if you don't yet have an account, you'll need to create one).

But we need to get better at serving the Mac market. In these tight economic times we're facing stiff competition with our Mac book titles, web traffic, and Mac OS X Conference. You can help us do better by taking a bit of time to complete the Mac DevCenter survey we've put together.

The survey is being served by Zoomerang, and it takes only a few minutes. For our part, we'll let you know what your comrades have to say. Once the results have been compiled, I'll put together a summary article.

And if you have more to say about your likes and dislikes concerning the Mac DevCenter, our Mac book titles, or our OS X conference, please drop me a line after you've completed the survey.

Thanks for your help. We'll try to give you a good return on your time investment.

Until next time,
Derrick
--
Derrick Story
O'Reilly Network Managing Editor

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Tell Us What You Think: The First Survey of Mac DevCenter Readers
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