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Start a Chain Reaction

by Derrick Story
Mac Newsletter for 03/28/2003

Dear Mac Reader,

Earlier this week we released our Call for Papers (CFP) for the Mac OS X Conference that will be held in Santa Clara, California on October 27-30. If you go to the conference home page, you'll see that we are "looking for proposals from the people who are creating the future of the Mac," and that's what I'd like to talk about for a few moments today.

As you know already, the majority of our Mac DevCenter contributors are developers who are either working on the platform, or who are exploring it in-depth during the wee hours of the morning (when they should be otherwise sleeping). Publishing is a way for those discoveries to reach new audiences. And we're happy to facilitate that process.

Along those same lines, the first round of the Mac OS X Innovators contest closed today (Friday) at 5 p.m., PST. Round two launches on May 1. I'm very excited about this event because it's another way for great ideas to make it off someone's personal iBook and into mainstream computing. I'm hoping that a number of new stars emerge as a result of this effort.

But there's a third way to shine a light on the insanely great work you're doing, and that is to speak at our upcoming Mac OS X Conference. Wearing a "Faculty" badge at that event is like being singled out as the smartest person at a Mensa gathering. In the real world of hacking and system administration, it's the best of the best.

None of these aspects are mutually exclusive. In fact, if you're already writing or you have entered Mac Innovators, then you should seriously consider speaking at our Mac conference. All the details are posted at:

http://conferences.oreilly.com/macosxcon/

To subscribe to the Mac newsletter (or any O'Reilly Network newsletters), visit http://www.oreillynet.com/cs/user/home and select the newsletters you wish to receive in your user profile (you'll need to log in with your existing O'Reilly Network account -- if you don't yet have an account, you'll need to create one).

You, my friend, are the future of Mac OS X. Each time a great idea is presented in front of others, a dozen chain reactions begin that move the platform forward. Start your chain reaction today, and let's get this show on the road.

Until next time,
Derrick Story
O'Reilly Network Managing Editor

PS: Mensa International is an international high-IQ society that welcomes people from every walk of life whose IQ is in the top 2% of the population.

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