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Developer Contest in the Works

by Derrick Story
Mac Newsletter for 02/14/2003

Dear Mac Reader,

As you know, I've been invigorated by the creativity independent developers have been bringing to the Mac platform. Earlier this week I wrote a weblog highlighting Contextual Menu plug-ins. Recent articles on the Mac DevCenter have also demonstrated some of this innovation.

If you've followed my letters and the news from our site, you also know that we want to do more than publish articles (although we love these developer tutorials!). After a couple of meetings this week, I feel it's safe to say that we have something very cool in the works for developers who want to shine a bright light on their ideas.

At the end of this month, I'll be posting a detailed article discussing a series of three developer competitions managed by O'Reilly. These competitions will correspond to the next three conferences we're hosting: Emerging Technology, Open Source, and Mac OS X.

Some of the highlights of these competitions include:

  1. If you've been working on a cool application, plug-in, or enhancement to Mac OS X, you'll probably be eligible to enter it in these competitions. We want very few restrictions for entry.
  2. The point of this effort is to help developers with good ideas earn success in the marketplace. There's going to be some serious muscle behind making that happen.
  3. We're also going to back this up with at least two major prizes per competition.

The deadline for submission for the first competition will probably be March 28th. Spread the word on this! We want everyone to know as quickly as possible so they have time to get their entries together. Keep your eyes peeled for the rules to be posted on Friday, February 28 (corporate forces willing).

To subscribe to the Mac newsletter (or any O'Reilly Network newsletters), visit http://www.oreillynet.com/cs/user/home and select the newsletters you wish to receive in your user profile (you'll need to log in with your existing O'Reilly Network account -- if you don't yet have an account, you'll need to create one).

This is going to be exciting stuff. . .
Derrick
--
Derrick Story
O'Reilly Network Managing Editor
derrick@oreilly.com

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