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Mac Spirit

by Derrick Story
Mac Newsletter for 01/17/2003

Dear Mac Reader,

Before we get back to our regularly scheduled programming, I want to make two comments about last week's Macworld SF.

First, Steve Jobs keynote address. As a technology reporter, I sit in on a lot of keynotes. Most of them are good, some are terrible, and very few are outstanding.

Over the years my favorite keynoters have been Guy Kawasaki, Lawrence Lessig, and Steve Jobs. These three guys have a few traits in common. They are always very well prepared, have charisma, and are willing to put themselves on the line.

In my last letter I had five Macworld wishes. Only one was granted:

"5. - Attitude. Last year Steve Jobs firmly stated that Apple was going to "innovate its way out of this downturn." I loved that. This year I want to hear that Apple is going to kick butt. I can't think of a better time to show some real attitude."

Steve came out on stage last Tuesday full of energy, well-prepared, and with the attitude that Apple is a serious player in the personal computing game, no matter what anyone says. This attitude had a powerful impact on the ensuing conference, which leads me to my second observation.

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People who use Macintosh are more fun. Period.

I won't name names of other technology conferences that I work where I feel like I'm stuck in a three-day dental appointment, but that certainly isn't the case at Macworld, especially this year. For some weird reason that defies economic trends, market share, and the world political scene, Mac users seem extremely buoyant.

When I worked in the O'Reilly booth, spoke in the User Group Lounge, taught at the iPhoto User Group session, the interactions were consistently positive, inquisitive, and engaging.

If you are developing for Mac OS X, or involved with this platform in some other community aspect, I'd like you to consider this thought:

Think of Macworld SF like the spirit of Christmas. It's not just a once a year event; rather, a frame of mind that can span an entire year. Mac people don't just think different(ly); they are different.

Until next time,
Derrick
--
Derrick Story
O'Reilly Network Managing Editor
derrick@oreilly.com

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