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Exchange of Ideas

by Derrick Story
Mac Newsletter for 12/06/2002

Dear Mac Reader,

Earlier this week I wrote a Weblog titled, "The Technology Beneath the Brand" , where I ended with this thought:

"... as technologists, we shouldn't let ourselves become hypnotized by effective brand advertising. There's always more beneath the surface--both good and bad. And we're the ones who need to keep that discussion alive, alongside the branded messages."

The Weblog has led to other discussions, and it finally occurred to me that maybe I should post some sort of weekly summary on Mac DevCenter that allows developers to say, "Hey, I'm working on this. Any comments?"

The idea is that I want to have an ongoing, visible, developer conversation that's accessible to the public and that augments the marketing-based blasts we endure on a daily basis.

I could do this a couple of different ways. One way would be to set up an email box into which developers send their thoughts, then publish a weekly rapsheet of these notes as an article (that would be archived and searchable, including Google) with TalkBacks at the end so others can comment.

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Another approach would be an outright forum that I monitor. For some reason I'm not as wild about the forum as I am about the rapsheet. But I'd also like to hear any ideas that you might have for this, including whether or not you think it's a good idea in the first place.

Let me know what you think.

Until next time,
Derrick
--
Derrick Story
O'Reilly Network Managing Editor
derrick@oreilly.com

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