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Helping the Mac Developer

by Derrick Story
Mac Newsletter for 09/27/2002

Dear Mac Reader,

We're starting a new chapter on the Mac DevCenter, and I'm really jazzed about it. Why? This week we're debuting, "Developing for Mac OS X," which focuses on assisting the Mac developer. But before I get to that, I want to give you a quick update about the site itself.

As you know, we launched MacDev in December 2000 when OS X wasn't exactly a household name. Since then we've seen steady growth. The curve has really climbed upward lately with traffic doubling since February 2002. Many of our readers have become contributors, and they have brought a richness to the content that I don't see much throughout the Web. Unlike other sites, we produce original, feature-length content every week of the year.

The focus of our writing to this point has been "mastering the platform." This means providing you with the information you need to do what you want to do -- regardless if it's using the GUI applications or working under the hood. I'll continue to publish heavily in this area, if for no other reason than because I personally find it exciting.

To subscribe to the Mac newsletter (or any O'Reilly Network newsletters), visit http://www.oreillynet.com/cs/user/home and select the newsletters you wish to receive in your user profile (you'll need to log in with your existing O'Reilly Network account -- if you don't yet have an account, you'll need to create one).

But now I'm adding a new theme--one that I think is going to raise the stakes considerably. I want the Mac DevCenter to become the place where emerging developers can learn how to create applications, then bring them to market. I believe we're at the point with this platform where you can make a living, or subsidize your existing livelihood, by creating tools for the Mac. This theme will be titled, "Developing for Mac OS X."

Our opening salvo is an interview with Watson chief architect, Dan Wood. Dan is a terrific guy, a savvy developer, and a fine example for all who aspire to take an idea and bring it to market. He's even survived competition with the Mother Ship herself when Apple borrowed many of his innovations and incorporated them into Sherlock 3. I think you'll like reading what Dan has to say.

After that, I'm going to set loose a three-part shareware series written by Sanford Selznick. Sanford is a seasoned shareware developer, and he's going to show you how to turn your great ideas into marketable products. From there we're just going to keep pushing forward right into 2003. If you have something to contribute, or suggestions for me to pursue, please let me know. Now is the time, while the economy is soft, to develop our products and ideas. Then together, we'll be ready to zoom forward when things pick up.

Thanks for reading,
Derrick
--
Derrick Story
O'Reilly Network Managing Editor
derrick@oreilly.com

Featured Articles

Interview with Watson's Dan Wood
You'd think that after his tangle with Apple over Sherlock 3, Dan Wood would be telling developers to run for the hills, unless you know Dan Wood. In this interview he talks about Watson, Sherlock 3, and the direction of the Internet.

Utilities for Switching on the Cheap
Once you've migrated to Mac OS X, you'll probably find that you're missing a few of those handy utilities that make life so much easier. Here's a quick switcher's survival guide for Web producers and other online specialists.

Homemade Dot-Mac with OS X, Part 2
In part one of this series, Alan Graham showed you how to make your OS X Mac a functional Web server, and essentially create your own .Mac site. Now he digs even deeper into firewalls, domain names, and FTP.

Serve Your iCal Calendars Using WebDAV
Apple is more than happy to host your iCal calendars via its Dot-Mac service. But you can serve your own calendars, and even have them automatically update subscriber versions, by using WebDAV. Erik Ray shows you how.

Switcher Stories Follow Up
After Tim O'Reilly posted his article, "Mac OS X Switcher Stories," he discovered that many people wanted to keep the conversation going. This article does just that and includes some fascinating comments from those who reacted both positively and negatively to the notion of moving to Mac OS X from other platforms.

Mac Devcenter Top Five Articles Last Week

  1. Serve Your iCal Calendars Using WebDAV
    Apple is more than happy to host your iCal calendars via its Dot-Mac service. But you can serve your own calendars, and even have them automatically update subscriber versions, by using WebDAV. Erik Ray shows you how.

  2. Homemade Dot-Mac with OS X, Part 2
    In part one of this series, Alan Graham showed you how to make your OS X Mac a functional Web server, and essentially create your own .Mac site. Now he digs even deeper into firewalls, domain names, and FTP.

  3. Utilities for Switching on the Cheap
    Once you've migrated to Mac OS X, you'll probably find that you're missing a few of those handy utilities that make life so much easier. Here's a quick switcher's survival guide for Web producers and other online specialists.

  4. Switcher Stories Follow Up
    After Tim O'Reilly posted his article, "Mac OS X Switcher Stories," he discovered that many people wanted to keep the conversation going. This article does just that and includes some fascinating comments from those who reacted both positively and negatively to the notion of moving to Mac OS X from other platforms.

  5. Configuring sendmail on Jaguar
    Sendmail is powerful, but at times appears complicated too. James Duncan Davidson helps you unravel the sendmail knot so you can configure this awesome mail server on your Mac OS X system.


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