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WWDC Reporting

by Derrick Story
04/26/2002

Dear Mac Reader,

Apple's Worldwide Developers Conference is right around the corner: May 6 - 10 in San Jose, Calif. Once again the O'Reilly booth will have a prominent location in the Internet Cafe, and we'll be selling books (we have some great new titles) and meeting with developers. We also have a couple of important announcements that we'll be making early in the conference.

Since Steve Jobs is launching WWDC with a keynote address, we know he'll disclose a couple hot items that we can report. The official Apple press release quotes Jobs as saying, "To get our developers even more excited, we'll be giving them a sneak peek at the next release of Mac OS X, code named Jaguar." That'll be cool.

But after the keynote, things might get a little quiet on the reporting front. In case you didn't realize, all Apple developers who attend the show are under non-disclosure agreements (NDAs). That includes O'Reilly.

It's a tough situation for Apple. Certainly developers need to know what's coming down the pike so they can create the products of the future. The rub is, the folks in Apple Marketing have learned the value of controlling new product announcements so they receive the most publicity possible. Remember the cover of Time magazine? It's hard to keep secrets and keep your developer community informed at the same time.

Our policy at O'Reilly is to respect Apple's NDA. But there's plenty we can report on at the show, and I guarantee that we'll have lots of goodies for you to peruse online during the conference.

Of course, if you really want to know what will be going on in San Jose, there's still time to register. ;)

Until next time,

Derrick Story
O'Reilly Network Managing Editor
derrick@oreilly.com


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