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Photoshop Arrives

by Derrick Story
03/05/2002

Dear Mac Reader,

So what are we going to do now that we can't complain about the lack of Photoshop 7 anymore?

Adobe has ruined all of our fun by announcing the Carbonized release of our favorite image editor -- oh, and there's an XP version, too. Both applications contain new features such as the healing brush and the patch tool.

Now that Photoshop is here, all our problems are solved, right? Well, not exactly. But before I get to that, I have a few words for our friends at Adobe:

"Hooray! You guys came through for us. Now we have GoLive 6, Illustrator X, LiveMotion 2, and Photoshop 7 -- all running on Mac OS X. In each case you added some terrific new features. We appreciate your efforts and continued support for the Mac community."

That being said ... not everyone is out of the woods yet.

For folks like me who don't really have a production system (or any kind of system for that fact), Photoshop 7 pretty much completes my unwavering transition to Mac OS X. May I never load Classic again! (Or as Andrew Shalat wrote in his OSXfaq.com review of Photoshop 7, "... we spend all our time avoiding Classic mode the way we do annoying relatives at the family reunion.")

But for professional designers who use a variety of Photoshop plug-ins, Quark for print layout, and a host of other non-Carbonized tools, there's still pain.

I was talking about this the other night during an interview on "The Mac Show Live!" Now that Adobe had produced the Carbonized Photoshop we've been waiting for, supporting developers will most likely follow suit with their tools. But it's going to be a while before every piece of the puzzle is in place.

And it's going to cost money. First, pros will have to pay the $149 upgrade for Photoshop, then pony up for each new plug-in and companion tool. Ouch!

For the rest of us, it's truly a time to celebrate (except for the $149 thing). The only other application that I want half as bad as Photoshop is the OS X version of the Palm desktop -- that beta just isn't doing it for me.

But we'll save that discussion for another time. For the moment, I'm going to fire up that healing brush and let the rendering begin!

Until next time,

Derrick Story
O'Reilly Network Managing Editor
derrick@oreilly.com

(OK, now that everyone has left the theater ...)

Andrew's review of Photoshop 7 on OSXFAQ can be found here

If you want to hear my interview from The Mac Show Live!, I grabbed the QuickTime clip of the 20-minute segment and posted it on my Mac site (once you're there you'll see the link): http://homepage.mac.com/dstory


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