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Apple's Core

by Derrick Story
02/18/2002

Dear Mac Reader,

I was thinking about a MacSlash post I read the other day talking about a guy who has been unsucessful in getting a job at Apple. More than 85 comments followed, some from alleged Apple residents, giving him the inside scoop on employment at 1 Infinite Loop.

I didn't post to that thread, but I thought you might be interested in hearing a little bit about the Cupertino clan from our vantage point in Sebastopol.

We work mostly with the folks in Developer Relations. They're really a great bunch. Sometimes when I'm in a meeting or talking on the phone, I think to myself, "Do you realize that lots of people wonder about what it's like to live your life?"

Behind the scenes, the average day at Apple doesn't appear to be that much different than your day or mine -- an existence of overflowing schedules, email boxes, and ToDo lists. And when it's all said and done, Steve, Avie, and Phil squeeze into their 501s the same way we do.

There's one difference, however. The Mac is a magical machine, and the people at Apple are its caretakers. When you're sitting in a meeting at 1 Infinity Loop, the conversation may drift all over table, but the focus is always right there front and center: how do we make the computer better and sell as many of them as possible?

That's why I like working with them. They know what they want to do, and they have a pretty good idea about how to do it.

So even though I can't tell you how it is to work for Apple, I can tell you that working with Apple is terrific. The developer group is friendly, hard working, and dedicated. They know a good business deal when they see one, and they can smell a bad one a mile away.

But the most important thing I want to convey is this ... the computer you love is in good hands. I believe they are executing one of the best business plans they've ever had. And even though working for Apple may have its benefits, owning a Mac is probably a lot more fun.

Until next time,

Derrick Story
O'Reilly Network Managing Editor
derrick@oreilly.com

MacSlash Thread: "How to get a job at Apple"


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