macdevcenter.com
oreilly.comSafari Books Online.Conferences.

advertisement

AddThis Social Bookmark Button

Macworld Wish List

by Derrick Story
01/04/2002

Dear Mac Reader,

Here's my confession: I love keynote addresses by Steve Jobs. He may be the best CEO showman ever. And he knows a thing or two about personal computing.

I've heard many of the rumors about what he's going to unveil on Jan. 7. We all have -- that's part of the fun, right? But I don't want to talk about those today. Instead, I want to take a deep breath and list five things that I think Apple should emphasize in the first quarter of this year. And with any luck, one or two of these items will be on Steve's list too.

First, the iMac has to get as good as the iBook. The iBook is one of the most perfect laptop computers I've ever seen. It's solid, handsome, modern, feature laden, cool, and affordable.

The iBook is much better than the iMac. You could argue that the iMac saved Apple, and maybe it did. The fact of the matter is that it has yet to live up to its potential. Too many hard drive problems, bad video cards, and lack of expansion have kept the iMac from realizing the great concept that it is. Give us a great iMac -- don't just slap a flat panel screen on the existing machine. Rework it from the ground up.

And speaking of desktop computers, for Pete's sake get us over the 1 GHz hump. I'm tired of listening to PC weenies brag about their fast processors. Sure speed isn't everything, but it sure helps.

Next, if Adobe won't give us Photoshop for Mac OS X, then find someone who will. I've heard all of the excuses for Adobe. But they've known about Mac OS X for as long as the rest of us. A huge part of Apple's market won't even consider Mac OS X until Photoshop goes Carbon. Apple, you've done it before ... write it yourself if Adobe continues to lag behind.

Then, make QuickTime the standard. Real Networks is having problems and Microsoft still hasn't hit the sweet spot with Media Player. QuickTime is a killer technology in spite of Apple marketing. Take control of the market now and never look back. We should be seeing TV ads for QuickTime. If the iPod is good enough for a commercial break, then QuickTime certainly is too.

Finally, and just as important, roll out every red carpet in Cupertino to the Java and open source community. Mac OS X was made for these people, and in turn, they can take Apple way beyond their current 4 percent market share. It's a marriage waiting to happen, so let the serious dating begin. Apple has made a nice effort in this area, but there's much more work to be done.

If Apple can take advantage of these opportunities, then we'll be enjoying Mr. Jobs' addresses for years to come.

See you at Macworld,

Derrick Story
O'Reilly Network Managing Editor
derrick@oreilly.com

PS: We'll be reporting on all the happenings at Macworld, including the keynote address. Don't forget to stop by Monday!

To subscribe to the Mac newsletter (or any O'Reilly Network newsletters), visit http://www.oreillynet.com/cs/user/home and select the newsletters you wish to receive in your user profile (you'll need to log in with your existing O'Reilly Network account -- if you don't yet have an account, you'll need to create one).

Featured Articles

Apache Web-Serving with Mac OS X: Part 3
We've fired-up the Apache web server in Mac OS X and enabled CGI -- what other goodies are waiting to be discovered? In this article Kevin Hemenway shows you how to enable PHP on your Mac web server.

Animating Graphics in Cocoa, Part I
In his latest column, Mike Beam shows you how to put your Cocoa graphics in motion and introduces you to several new classes including NSAffineTransform, NSTimer, and NSThread, as well as a new method of an old class, NSBezierPath.

Seven Mac OS X Tips
Here are a few OS X gems to add to your guru bag of tricks -- from hassle-free printing to quick and dirty PDFs. Check out these Mac OS X tips.

Getting to the Source of Mac OS X
Darwin is the engine powering Unix-based Mac OS X. And there's more to the Darwin story than many realize -- from its Public Source license to the ongoing effort to port it to the Intel platform.

O'Reilly Network Mac Devcenter Top Five Articles Last Week

1. Seven Mac OS X Tips
Here are a few OS X gems to add to your guru bag of tricks -- from hassle-free printing to quick and dirty PDFs. Check out these Mac OS X tips.

2. Getting to the Source of Mac OS X
Darwin is the engine powering Unix-based Mac OS X. And there's more to the Darwin story than many realize -- from its Public Source license to the ongoing effort to port it to the Intel platform.

3. Learning the Mac OS X Terminal: Part 1
The Terminal application in Mac OS X is a new benefit to traditional Mac users, and it's a terrific one. Chris Stone shows you step by step how to get comfortable with the Terminal, and how to accomplish your first task via the command line.

4. Apache Web-Serving with Mac OS X: Part 1
In this first part of a multi-part series, Kevin Hemenway shows you how to start serving web pages directly from your Mac using its built-in Apache server.

5. Apache Web-Serving with Mac OS X: Part 2
In Apache Part 1, Kevin Hemenway showed you how to start serving web pages in Mac OS X. Now, he explores the CGI access that's built into your Mac OS X system.