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Making Movies with Mac OS X 10.1 (for cheap!)

by Derrick Story
10/27/2001

Dear Reader,

If you're a digital photography enthusiast, chances are you have everything you need to become a digital film maker too -- and for cheap!

On the camera side of the equation, many current digital still models by Olympus, Canon, Nikon, and Sony have what they call a "movie mode." The details vary from brand to brand, but essentially this means that you can capture short QuickTime clips with your "traditional" still camera and upload them to your Mac. Typically these clips are 30 seconds long at 15 frames per second.

Then, if Mac OS X is your platform of choice, you can use its free bundled applications -- QuickTime 5, iMovie 2.1, Image Capture 1.5, and iTools -- to combine, edit, enhance, and publish your productions.

Learn the ins and outs, plus a few secrets, in my current two-part QuickTime Authoring column on our Mac DevCenter titled, "Digital Still Cameras for QuickTime Movies." Part one explains how to capture great looking video, and it's published right now ready for you to read. Part two, will give you all the details on how to set up your own personal digital editing room with Mac OS X, and it goes live on Wednesday morning, Oct. 31.

If you'd like to see a movie sample made with a Canon digital still camera and produced in Mac OS X, go to: http://homepage.mac.com/dstory/imovie.html

You'll need QuickTime 5 installed to view this video about Canadian Geese in Vancouver, B.C. because I'm using the amazing Sorenson Video 3 codec that now comes free with QT.

Even if you haven't made the leap into digital photography yet, make sure you read this column so you'll choose the right equipment when the time comes. Because once you have that camera, you'll want to tap all the great features of Mac OS X.

Until next time,

Derrick
---
Derrick Story
O'Reilly Network Managing Editor
derrick@oreilly.com

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