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Cocoa Sheets

by David Sims
10/13/2001

Dear Mac Reader,

This week on O'Reilly Network's Mac Dev Center, Mike Beam continues his in-depth exploration of Programming with Cocoa. OS X implements a new way to handle dialog boxes, with windows called "sheets" that are attached to other windows. Mike says they enable a cleaner, less cluttered workspace. He shows two ways to implement them in Cocoa, one with a pre-built function from AppKit, and another way that he says is more flexible. You'll also find links to Mike's previous columns, and a sidebar to the catalog page for O'Reilly's, "Learning Cocoa," published in May.

We also continue to look at Java and OS X. In previous columns on Java Programming on the Mac, Daniel Steinberg has introduced GUI programming and looked at packaging Java apps with MRJAppBuilder. This week Daniel is back with a column on shell scripts, command lines and classpaths. Whereas developers on a Windows platform can click on a .bat file to run an app, those working in OS X will need to learn how to package them to run from the command line or through a shell script.

To subscribe to the Mac newsletter (or any O'Reilly Network newsletters), visit http://www.oreillynet.com/cs/user/home and select the newsletters you wish to receive in your user profile (you'll need to log in with your existing O'Reilly Network account -- if you don't yet have an account, you'll need to create one).

Finally, if you're waiting for a prod to upgrade to OS 10.1, it's here. Our managing editor, Derrick Story, snagged a CD with the upgrade at Seybold a few weeks back and carefully documented the process. Read his "Disaster-Free Upgrade to Mac OS 10.1" and you won't want to wait to upgrade your machine.

That's it for this week. Derrick, the regular author of this newsletter, will be back from vacation -- tanned, rested, and ready -- next week.

Dave

David Sims
Editorial Director
O'Reilly Network


Feature Articles

Shell Scripts, Command Lines, and Classpaths
Programming in Java on the Mac is a bit different than programming from within the Windows environment. This article examines issues involving classpaths and running applications from the command line and through shell scripts while working on a Mac.

Working with Sheets in Cocoa
A feature of Mac OS X is a new way to handle dialog boxes, called sheets. This is a special kind of window that is actually attached to another window. This article explores two different ways to implement sheets in Cocoa.

The Disaster-Free Upgrade to Mac OS 10.1
Is this the Mac system upgrade you've been waiting for, or is it still too early for you to make the leap? This article helps you decide, and if you choose to upgrade, how to do so painlessly.

Patents, Royalties, and the Future of the Web
The W3C's proposal to allow royalty-encumbered patented technology into Web standards has attracted much criticism and debate. Kendall Clark provides a comprehensive overview of the controversy.


O'Reilly Network Mac Devcenter Top Five Articles Last Week

  1. The Disaster-Free Upgrade to Mac OS 10.1
    Is this the Mac system upgrade you've been waiting for, or is it still too early for you to make the leap? This article helps you decide, and if you choose to upgrade, how to do so painlessly.

  2. Working with Sheets in Cocoa
    A feature of Mac OS X is a new way to handle dialog boxes, called sheets. This is a special kind of window that is actually attached to another window. This article explores two different ways to implement sheets in Cocoa.

  3. Shell Scripts, Command Lines, and Classpaths
    Programming in Java on the Mac is a bit different than programming from within the Windows environment. This article examines issues involving classpaths and running applications from the command line and through shell scripts while working on a Mac.

  4. Mixing Java and Titanium: Part Three
    This is part three of a three-part series on Java and Mac OS X from a Java programmer's point of view. In this article, James Duncan Davidson takes a look at Cocoa from his side of the fence. He also shares his views on swing apps for Mac OS X.

  5. The Objective-C Language
    In this third installment of Programming With Cocoa, Mike Beam explains how to send messages to objects, as well as other basics of Objective-C authoring.


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