macdevcenter.com
oreilly.comSafari Books Online.Conferences.

advertisement

AddThis Social Bookmark Button

Apple and Adobe Shine at Seybold, plus a Disaster-Free Upgrade to OS 10.1

by Derrick Story
09/28/2001

Dear Mac Reader,

This week's Seybold conference in San Francisco was a proud moment for many in our community.

I know a lot of people were unable to attend. That's understandable considering the circumstances in the world right now. And by the look of the show floor, many vendors decided not to come too. From a conference perspective, the show was teetering on disaster.

But two companies in particular stepped forward, put the show on their backs, and carried the rest of us along. Those companies? Apple and Adobe. Let's start with Apple.

Steve Jobs didn't have to make an appearance during the Tuesday keynote. Phil Shiller was already slated to run the show. But Steve bounded on to stage and fired-up the troops. His appearance was the shot in the arm the audience needed.

Then Apple provided a full copy of the 10.1 upgrade to any show attendee who wanted one. After having tested 10.1 for the past few days, I have to say this was one of the best give-aways of all time. It's fantastic, and we all got it in our hands days before the public release.

Apple ran their demos and staffed the floor as if tens of thousands of attendees had showed up, when in reality attendance was sparse. I think Apple showed commitment, guts, and pride at Seybold. As a customer, they scored many points with me.

Adobe also made a statement. Adobe set up dozens of G4 workstations with brand new LCD monitors and ran their free classes as usual. I can't tell you how comforting it was to see Adobe going about their business on the expo floor. And they made their presence felt during the Tuesday keynote too as they expressed their commitment to Mac OS X. Better yet, they showed a little of that competitive spirit that I think has been missing lately from them.

To subscribe to the Mac newsletter (or any O'Reilly Network newsletters), visit http://www.oreillynet.com/cs/user/home and select the newsletters you wish to receive in your user profile (you'll need to log in with your existing O'Reilly Network account -- if you don't yet have an account, you'll need to create one).

Adobe also had a great give-away -- their high-tech silver screen bags were ultra-cool. Considering the fact that I could barely get a ballpoint pen from other vendors on the floor, those bags were treasure. It cost Adobe a lot of money to stand up at Seybold and be counted as one of the leaders in the Mac community. They deserve acknowledgement.

This is what I came away with from Seybold. I now know who the tough guys are in our business. I'm grateful to Apple, Adobe, Canon, Nikon, Microsoft, American Express, Epson, HP, Leaf, Minolta, Pantone, Quark, and all the other vendors, large and small, who honored their agreements and came to San Francisco.

And I saw a lot of personal friends too who decided to go ahead and make the trip. I say to all of you, "Thanks for being there."

Until next time,

Derrick
---
Derrick Story
O'Reilly Network Managing Editor


Featured Articles

The Disaster-Free Upgrade to Mac OS 10.1
Is this the Mac system upgrade you've been waiting for, or is it still too early for you to make the leap? This article helps you decide, and if you choose to upgrade, how to do so painlessly.

Mixing Java and Titanium: Part Three
This is part three of a three-part series on Java and Mac OS X from a Java programmer's point of view. In this article, James Duncan Davidson takes a look at Cocoa from his side of the fence. He also shares his views on swing apps for Mac OS X.

REALbasic for HyperCard Users
REALbasic, the integrated development environment and application framework from REAL Software, lets you draw an interface and assign code to its pieces just like Apple's now outdated HyperCard. Matt Neuburg shows HyperCard users the advantages and disadvantages of using REALbasic.

Sneak Peek at Canvas 8 for Mac OS X
Canvas 8 for Mac OS X could be considered an IDE for web artists. Here's a sneak peek at this new release.

Adding a Preferences Window to Your Application
Up to this point, this column's Cocoa projects have been single window applications. This week we'll delve into the multi-window world by adding a Preferences window, which is a staple of any application.

CrossOver Brings QuickTime Movies to Linux: Part 2
It's true. CrossOver enables QuickTime movie playback on Linux. In this second part of a two-part series, we test its performance and see how far we can push its capabilities.

O'Reilly Network Mac Devcenter Top Five Articles Last Week

  1. Mixing Java and Titanium: Part Three
    This is part three of a three-part series on Java and Mac OS X from a Java programmer's point of view. In this article, James Duncan Davidson takes a look at Cocoa from his side of the fence. He also shares his views on swing apps for Mac OS X.

  2. REALbasic for HyperCard Users
    REALbasic, the integrated development environment and application framework from REAL Software, lets you draw an interface and assign code to its pieces just like Apple's now outdated HyperCard. Matt Neuburg shows HyperCard users the advantages and disadvantages of using REALbasic.

  3. Mixing Java and Titanium: Part 1
    Recently James Duncan Davidson published a series of weblogs on the subject of Java and Mac OS X for O'Reilly Network. These blogs contained lots of useful information that was too good to get buried deep within the network labyrinth, so we've updated them and are now presenting the content in a series of three articles. This is part one of the series.

  4. Sneak Peek at Canvas 8 for Mac OS X
    Canvas 8 for Mac OS X could be considered an IDE for web artists. Here's a sneak peek at this new release.

  5. Mixing Java and Titanium, Part Two
    As we continue to explore Java on Mac OS X with James Duncan Davidson, we look at the easiest way to create a double-clickable Java program on Mac OS X, plus experiences with Project Builder, and fun with Quartz.


Return to list of Mac Newsletters.

Return to the Mac DevCenter.