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OS Directory Launch

by Derrick Story
08/06/2001

Dear Mac Reader,

I had lunch with Jay Greenspan (www.trans-city.com) at O'Reilly's Open Source Convention. Jay's been writing technical stuff for years for publications such as Webmonkey and Wired, and he really understands open source technology. Most importantly, he likes the Mac.

I was using Jay as a sounding board to help me figure out how to position content on the Mac DevCenter. I've noticed that when I publish in-depth articles on PHP, Cocoa, XFree86, etc., we attract a loyal, but relatively small following. Articles that are more general in nature, such as how to install Mac OS X on a laptop, have done very well but haven't necessarily added new folks to our community.

After a lively conversation, I decided that we need to provide quality content to both general groups of readers. As I see it, Mac OS X is going to be the entry point to open source and to Java for a whole new audience who never previously considered working with these technologies.

For example, this week, Daniel Steinberg explains how to build a simple Java app in Mac OS X. In his earlier column he talked directly to experienced Java developers who were considering moving over to the Mac. I'm not a savvy Java programmer, so I'm pretty excited about this week's article.

To subscribe to the Mac newsletter (or any O'Reilly Network newsletters), visit http://www.oreillynet.com/cs/user/home and select the newsletters you wish to receive in your user profile (you'll need to log in with your existing O'Reilly Network account -- if you don't yet have an account, you'll need to create one).

As for the open source side of things, I'm happy to announce the debut of our Mac Open Source Software Directory. We already have more than 100 entries, and this thing should grow in leaps and bounds over the coming months. I believe the directory will be useful for everyone in our audience.

So now you know what I'm thinking. I'd like to hear what you want to see. As a newsletter subscriber, you're part of the elite, and I pay more attention to comments from subscribers than from any one else.

Until next time,

Derrick


This Week's Features

Introducing the Mac Open Source Software Directory
This directory of open source software for the Mac has more than 100 entries and will continue to grow in the coming months as new titles are released.

Building a Simple Java Application in Mac OS X
The word is getting out that Mac OS X is a terrific development platform for Java. In this article Daniel Steinberg shows you the basic steps needed for getting a simple GUI application up and running.

Amazing Media Player Brings PDA Video to Life
Generic Media's version 2 of its Palm OS player enables QuickTime video and audio playback on Visors, Palms, and Clies. And if you have have a color PDA, it's downright amazing.

Memory Management in Objective-C
The goal of memory management is to keep your application running like a well-oiled machine. Mike Beam discusses how to reduce memory leaks and keep your application from becoming a sluggish mess.

Font Management in Mac OS X
Until we see Carbon and Cocoa versions of font management tools for Mac OS X, we can rely on a few Unix tricks to keep from going "font crazy."

PHP on Mac OS X
The BSD underpinnings of Mac OS X allow PHP to run as an Apache module in its native Unix environment. Here's how to load and run PHP on your Mac OS X system.


O'Reilly Network Mac DevCenter Top Five Articles Last Week

  1. Memory Management in Objective-C
    The goal of memory management is to keep your application running like a well-oiled machine. Mike Beam discusses how to reduce memory leaks and keep your application from becoming a sluggish mess.

  2. PHP on Mac OS X
    The BSD underpinnings of Mac OS X allow PHP to run as an Apache module in its native Unix environment. Here's how to load and run PHP on your Mac OS X system.

  3. Font Management in Mac OS X
    Until we see Carbon and Cocoa versions of font management tools for Mac OS X, we can rely on a few Unix tricks to keep from going "font crazy."

  4. The Objective-C Language
    In this third installment of Programming With Cocoa, Mike Beam explains how to send messages to objects, as well as other basics of Objective-C authoring.

  5. Build Your First Cocoa App
    Now the fun begins. This week, Mike Beam shows you how to build your first Cocoa application -- and it's not just a "Hello, World" screen -- it's a real text editor.


Talk Backs

Jobs' Keynote Steady, But No Sizzle
Subject: Nobody can Bat 1000
From: duncan
-------------------------------------------------
Like many, I was curious to see what the new iMac was going to look like. And I would like to have OS X 10.1 in my hands right now. But given the sheer number of things that Apple has done this year -- and is planning on doing before the year closes -- I'm not really disappointed. If Apple were trying to only impress show goers, they would have introduced the new iBook at MacWorld instead of at their corporate headquarters 10 weeks ago. But, they got the iBook in the pipeline when they needed to. I'd rather see Apple do it this way than to gear everything to only impress people in the audience.

Grade Apple on what they've done on the year so far, and they are getting a solid A.

Memory Management in Objective-C
Subject: Where is the folklore
From: CanyonRat
Response to: Object Semantics
-------------------------------------------------
ObjC hasn't really been used by enough people for long enough to have its folklore published yet. That's OK. The books that capture the spirit and the conventions of any development system are distilled from news groups and mailing lists. You can always go to the source. Stroustrup suggests that if you are seriously using any language, you should subscribe to at least two news groups/mailing lists dedicated to it. I think that's good advice.

For ObjC the best candidates seem to be:
cocoa-dev@lists.apple.com
and
macosx-dev@omnigroup.com

You can learn a lot just lurking. But do ask questions. The folks are friendly and helpful.

-------------------------------------------------

And CanyonRat's follow-up note:

I should have given the web address of those lists. Cocoa-dev is at:
http://lists.apple.com/mailman/listinfo/cocoa-dev
macosx-dev is at:
http://www.omnigroup.com/community/developer/mailinglists/macosx-dev/


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